The Pokeberry Quilt

The Pokeberry Quilt

Thursday, March 09, 2017

The Emily Munroe quilt


This is where I left off back in October of 2016.
All the blocks basted together.

 
Now I have separated all the blocks in the first row
so I can start the potholder method of reconstructing the quilt.
 
 
The back of one block with the wool front folded over to
a backing and whipped stitched down.
Only 53 more blocks to go.

 
Each block will then be hand stitched to each other
 in the same fashion as the original Civil War quilt.
 
These details are all documented by Frances Quinn
 of Hoopla Patterns who reproduced the quilt design.
 
 
 
 

8 comments:

  1. How interesting that you are going to do the potholder method. I have yet to try the method but want to.

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  2. It's so beautiful, Nancy!
    And I'm intrigued... I've never heard of the potholder method of finishing each block before they're joined together. It will be a true keepsake!

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  3. They are so beautiful.
    Don't think I have seen this method before.
    Hoping to see more as you go along!

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  4. Love the quilt and how you did yours, really beautiful work.

    Debbie

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  5. Lovely quilt and thanks for sharing the "method"

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  6. This is such a beautiful and interesting project/quilt. I have never seen anything like it. Gorgeous.

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  7. How exciting! I can't tell from the photo, but are you stitching the raw edge of the wool to the back? I would think that would be the only way it could be done to eliminate bulk. I have only seen the original once but I would say it would be difficult to tell which is which when placed beside yours. Lovely!

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  8. What a wonderful thing to see! I'm the Curator of the New England Quilt Museum and know the Emily Munroe quilt very well. In the original, the block edges are turned over the backing and whip-stitched down. They are not bound. I have to admit that I haven't seen Froncie Quinn's pattern. What directions does she give? And I agree with dear friend Wendy Caton Reed--you've done a wonderful job on this quilt!

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